#FOODPORN // Fez, Morocco

It is no secret I am a fan of food and cooking, one merely has to peruse my instagram account and witness my #foodporn phase. Traveling, thankfully, has resulted in me having less time for instagramming, and more time for eating.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESYesterday Chris and I participated in a Moroccan cooking class. The two girls running the class took us through the food market in the morning, where they bought some fresh meat and vegetables, and told us about the food available.

 

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

After collecting our food, it was back up to the culture cafe where the class was being held. There was a small kitchen used solely for these classes, and as there was only three of us in the class we all got to help out with various tasks. I cut up what felt like a kilo of fresh herbs!

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Our end meal was three courses: Above was our starter, of a traditional tomato based soup, an eggplant dip and some local flat breads. Our main, below, was a tagine of lamb, spices, broad beans and artichokes.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

We also had a simple dessert of coconut macaroons, with some amazing strawberries. It is safe to say we were well and truly full after all this! We also received a recipe book, so I am sure Moroccan cook ups will be on our horizons.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

That afternoon we hiked up the hill we had intended to yesterday. It was easy enough, and offered us spectacular views of the city and the surrounding countryside.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

We have one more full day left here today! It has gone so quick, despite being quite slow paced on account of my being sick. It worked out quite well that we had a few days here so we could take our time.

– Reanna.

EDIT: here a few extra photos from our last day in Fez. I didn’t take enough for them to make up a whole post!

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Advertisements

FOREVER LOST // Fez, Morocco

 

I intended to have this post up earlier today, but the wifi at our accommodation decided to die temporarily. So my apologies if the next few posts are in quick succession!

After wandering (slowly) around Rabat yesterday, we caught a train for a few hours to the city of Fez. The trip went quick enough, as there was plenty to look at in the countryside. Our adventures truly began as soon as we set foot off the train and into the city. Chris had booked our accommodation in the old city centre, a few kilometres from the station, and a lack of information about public transport saw us opt for a taxi. Needless to say, a taxi would not have been my first choice: the driver spoke minimal English, sped, honked his horn a lot and appeared to have no seat-belts in his car. We got to the outskirts of the old city safely (and it only cost a few dollars). As soon as we got out of the taxi we were approached by several locals men asking if we had reservations or needed directions (the medina/old city is well over 1000 years old and a veritable maze). We said no, but spent the next 45 minutes aimlessly wandering around, deflecting more locals offering to give directions (for a fee). On the verge of giving up, we stumbled into another guest house, where the owner was kind enough to call our hotel, and a worker came and collected us. Safe to say, we slept well that last night! Plus my fever subsided.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Fez is a whole other world unto itself. If we though Rabat was crazy, we were wrong. It seems as though local men and boys can pick out Chris and I as tourists from 50 metres away, and greet us in French, then English, offering directions, tours, hotels, pot and restaurant menus.

After hustling us into his uncles traditional rug shop (which was fascinating, up until he tried to sell us rugs) our hotel owner pointed us in the direction of terraces that would provide us with views of the medina. We paused out the front of a mosque on the way, wandering where to go, when a local man said he would show us the terraces. Thinking they were nearby we warily followed him through the rabbit warren of streets. He thankfully led us there, and we were shown onto the terraces, which overlook the tanneries of the city, as seen above. All this was free, but when coming down from the terrace, you are ushered through rooms of leather goods – with no prices – and encouraged to take a look.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

We wandered around on our own after that, though slower on my account (I am still quite weak and tire easily unfortunately!). Lunch was more local food, of course.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

In the afternoon we looked at Musee Batha, a museum of old handmade goods in a former palace.

After consulting a map board and noticing a few signs, we figured out we could follow a bit of a guided walk through the medina. It was great fun, poking your head around each corner and hoping the sign would appear again in the distance!

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The walk bypassed our hotel near the end, so we detoured for a short break, before continuing to the end. It brought us through a horribly muddy bric-a-brac area, which came outside the medina and onto some hills overlooking the city. SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

I had read that you could climb to the top of one of the slightly more distant hills for some amazing views, but it was quite overcast and I was already quite spent. We made do with climbing part way up a closer hill (again, we were followed by a local offering directions who wouldn’t leave us alone). SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESThe medina is a bit unnerving at night, and we would undoubtedly get lost, so we headed in for bed not long after dinner.

This country is certainly proving to be the cultural – and culinary! – experience we wanted. I will be back with more Fez adventures shortly!

– Reanna.

CULTURE SHOCK // Rabat, Morocco

 

As soon as we got off the bus from the airport into the city of Rabat, everything felt completely different to our previous travels. There was minimal English signage, fashion was different, and the language was a whole other world. The architecture was also in stark contrast to that of Europe. As Chris commented to me as we walked to our hotel, this was the first time we had felt completely foreign while traveling. We certainly stuck out, and not just because we were carrying giant backpacks! In particular, my pale skin and light coloured hair was something seldom seen.SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

We had to walk through the old town market, the Medina, to get to our hotel. The hotel itself, located on a little side street, was beautiful. We were only there for one night, but it was fantastic. However, I was still very sick and was unable to get out of bed for most of the morning. Eventually (after some medicine and more sleep) I was able to get up and we went for a very slow walk around the city. SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Everything is incredibly old and beautiful. The sun was shining, fulfilling the images we had of the country.SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

There were a few sites we didn’t manage to go see as I wasn’t up to the hike, but we got a good feel of the city anyway. Ever just walking through the Medina and taking in the sights, sounds and smells was experience enough. It seems peoples lives truly do revolve around the market place here.SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

There is an abundance of stray cats here, which I adored, despite Chris constantly pointing out they undoubtedly had feral diseases. At least I could enjoy looking at them!SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

We had Moroccan food the night before, but of course partook it in again for lunch. The restaurants are not much to look at, but the food is fantastic. And so cheap! All this was under $10.

Later that day we caught the train three hours to Fez. Now this city is a whole other level of crazy, which I shall elaborate on in time!

– Reanna.