“TOO MUCH IS AS BAD AS TOO LITTLE” // Beijing, China

With a metro population nearing that of the entirety of Australia, Beijing was like nothing I have ever experienced before. Looking at the metro map everyday was overwhelming, and I was always worried about getting lost! Thankfully after a few days in the city I managed to gain a bit of confidence, but I always kept screen shots on my phone of what metro lines I needed to take to get to my destination, and a screen shot of a map – I didn’t have internet on my phone!

When heading to the Lama Temple, which these photos are from, my carefully curated map directions on my phone turned out to be somewhat confusing, and I was sure I was lost when I emerged from the metro! After a few minutes of wandering around looking for a map or a sign, I saw some Western tourists heading down a street and followed them. Thankfully, they appeared to be heading in right direction and I eventually found my destination!

I would have been devastated if I didn’t find the Lama Temple, as it was one of my favourite building complexes in Beijing. It is still an active place of worship for Tibetan Buddhism, so it was quiet and full of the smell of incense. The buildings were a wonderful mix of colours, blending together across the complex.

It is recommended not to photograph inside temple buildings, so you will have to imagine the giant gold Buddha in one of the last buildings!

…Dragon turtles!?

After a quick coffee break, I ventured down the road to the Temple of Confucius.

I admittedly knew very little about Confucius before visiting the temple, and I surprised myself by spending most of my time there in a museum in one of the side buildings reading about his teachings. The title is one the many quotes of Confucius that I noted down.

There were many, many statues of Confucius dotted around the complex!

The Temple of Confucius was also connected to Guozijian, a former imperial college, being the highest form of education during the Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties.

Of course, being next to the Confucius temple, you can guess what they were studying!

After a bit more exploring of the area I headed into central Beijing to wander down Emperor’s Avenue and Dashilan (or Dashilar, if you speak with a Beijing accent!) Street, the main shopping district.

I decided I was in need of a warm place to sit and do some planning with wifi, so I desperately tried to remember the location of a coffee shop my friend had taken to me earlier in the week. After unsuccessfully trying a number of small, side hutongs, I almost cried when I stumbled across the coffee shop. Once I had settled down with a coffee, I discovered my friend was also heading there to study after his classes, so we ended up spending a few hours chatting!

The coffee shop has a rooftop terrace, providing the above view over the hutong buildings, giving a different perspective to the old, winding streets.

Whilst wandering down old hutongs is certainly stressful if you don’t know where you are doing, it certainly gives a fantastic perspective to everyday life of Beijing locals who live in the old houses. I discovered a bit more about the history of hutongs in Beijing during my stay, but that day is yet to come…

– Reanna

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